Chapter 11. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

If you have problems with Krusader please check the Installation procedure, as your problem may be caused by a bad installation.

The FAQ is divided into three sections:

If you feel that a FAQ is missing or if something is not clear to you, please let us know.

Installation FAQ

1. Does Krusader need KDE to run?
2. Which libraries does Krusader need to run?
3. I have followed all the steps but make complains about missing libs or headers. What do I need to do?
4. How do I compile Krusader when I am using a 64 bit processor?
5. I have downloaded the Source RPM krusader-x.xx.dist.src.rpm, what to do now?
6. I am trying to install binary foo (RPM or DEB package), but it fails. What is wrong?
7. I cannot find an RPM or DEB package for Krusader, what to do?
8. Some new menu items are missing after updating Krusader, what is wrong?
9. I am having trouble compiling and installing Krusader, how do I send a help request?
10. How can I build an RPM package for Krusader?
11. Why does Krusader-git show an old version number in the about box?
12. Why does Krusader not start on Mac® OS?

1.

Does Krusader need KDE to run?

No, Krusader does not need the KDE window manager to run on your computer but Krusader's natural environment is KDE, because it relies on services provided by the KDE base libraries. Only some shared libraries are needed e.g. KDE libraries, Qt™ libraries, etc. This means that Krusader runs on GNOME, AfterStep, XFce and other window managers provided the appropriate libraries are installed on your computer. All this is not a problem since the apt-get world can resolve these dependencies instantly.

You do not need to switch to the KDE window manager to use Krusader; you can still use GNOME, AfterStep, XFce or another window manager. However, the configuration of the Krusader fonts and some behavior is done by running systemsettings.

A lot depends on what you want to do with Krusader. You should know that Krusader uses the KDE KIO Slaves to access remote file systems, and support for only a limited number of file system types are shipped with KDE libraries, most of the KIO Slave are bundled with KDE base (including fish, sftp and tar). However, if you want the property-dialog to show EXIF-data for .jpeg's, you need KDEgraphics. If you want ID3-infos, you need KDEmultimedia, and so on.

To summarize, if you want a working Krusader - install KDElibs. If you want a functional Krusader then you need KDElibs + KDEbase. For maximum functionality, Krusader needs all of the KDE package libraries, but the KDE window manager is optional.

2.

Which libraries does Krusader need to run?

For running Krusader (e.g. when you have installed Krusader with a binary RPM) you need less libraries than if you compile Krusader from source. e.g. you only need the C-compiler gcc when you compile Krusader from source (see the next question).

Take a look at the Krusader dependencies paragraph of our install chapter.

If you need more details please take a look at the Krusader requirements on Ubuntu. The "depends" are required, the "suggests" make Krusader more powerful.

3.

I have followed all the steps but make complains about missing libs or headers. What do I need to do?

Install the missing packages.

Take a look at the Compilation requirements paragraph of our install chapter.

Most RPM-based distributions separate the headers from the libs. The headers are needed to compile Krusader. Look for packages in the form foo-devel-*.rpm (e.g. kdelibs-devel-foo.i586.rpm) or foo-dev-*.deb for Debian® based distributions. These are usually included with your distribution.

Tip

If you cannot find the needed package, use rpmfind and click 'missing lib or header' in the search line. Or use apt-cache search foo to find the corresponding package for Debian® based distributions.

4.

How do I compile Krusader when I am using a 64 bit processor?

As far as we know, there are no issues. Krusader is also available on many other architectures.

5.

I have downloaded the Source RPM krusader-x.xx.dist.src.rpm, what to do now?

  1. Check the ownership and the permissions on /usr/src/RPM/ and all recursive directories that your normal user can read-write-execute in these directories.

  2. To produce the binary RPM for your computer, do this:

    $ rpm --rebuild </path/to/rpmfile/> krusader-x.xx.dist.src.rpm

  3. If all dependencies are OK, a binary RPM krusader-x.xx.dist.rpm will be created at /usr/src/RPM/RPMS/i586 (replace i586 with your architecture).

  4. Test the binary RPM for errors before installing:

    $ rpm -i --test </path/to/rpmfile> krusader-x.xx.dist.rpm

    If the prompt returns without any message, then everything is OK.

  5. Install the binary RPM as usual, for example:

    $ su -c 'rpm -Uvh </path/to/rpmfile> krusader-x.xx.dist.rpm'

    You will be asked to enter your root password.

  6. Now you can start Krusader.

Tip

For more information about RPM, visit rpm.org and read the RPM Guide by Eric Foster-Johnson.

6.

I am trying to install binary foo (RPM or DEB package), but it fails. What is wrong?

Since we only prepare (and use) the source, we have no way of knowing this. Did you test the binary RPM before installing?

$ rpm -i --test </path/to/rpmfile> krusader-x.xx.dist.rpm

If the prompt returns without any message, then everything is OK. RPM's downloaded from our website are usually provided by Krusader users. Visit your distro website and search for an updated RPM.

If the RPM is not OK, try to find another package at Linux® software archives such as freshmeat.net or KDE-APPS.org. If you still cannot find the appropriate package for your Linux® distribution, we recommend searching for it with rpmfind or rpmpbone.

In general, a package for an older version of your distribution or even for another distribution might work on your computer (e.g. FC RPM's often work on Mdk and RH, and vice versa), but it is always the best that you install only RPM's that exactly match your distribution. If you cannot find a package that matches your distribution version, architecture or distribution, then use a source RPM. When you use a source RPM, the Krusader sources will be built, on your computer, guaranteeing a suitable binary RPM for your specific distribution and architecture. In addition, this method results in maximum system speed, since the resulting binary is customized for your computer. Please read the previous question, it explains how to install a source RPM. The best solution is explained in the next question.

7.

I cannot find an RPM or DEB package for Krusader, what to do?

Check if your distribution provides Krusader, if it does not then contact your distribution creator and ask them to include Krusader!

Did you take a look at the URLs on the Installation procedure page? If you have and found nothing, you can always compile Krusader from source. Even if you feel you have not got the necessary skills, you will probably succeed in compiling Krusader: we provide a very detailed installation procedure. This HowTo enables newcomers to compile Krusader from source, even if they have never done a compilation from source before, just follow the instructions carefully. Feel free to post a help request if you encounter problems.

8.

Some new menu items are missing after updating Krusader, what is wrong?

The krusaderui.rc file is stored in $KDEDIR/share/apps/krusader/krusaderui.rc. When you change the Toolbar, KDE makes a copy of that file in the home folder at ~/.kde/share/apps/krusader/krusaderui.rc. If Krusader was previously installed on your computer, and you install a newer Krusader version the ~/.kde/share/apps/krusader/krusaderui.rc file must be replaced with the newer version. Note: this will also reset all your changes on toolbars and shortcuts!

The first line of krusaderui.rc contains the version number. After installing a newer Krusader version, KDE will automatically replace the old ~/.kde/share/apps/krusader/krusaderui.rc with the newer version when starting the new Krusader for the first time (KDE will detect the newer version number in the first line).

If you install a development or beta version and Krusader was already installed on your computer then you should delete the krusaderui.rc file from your home directory to activate the new menu entries $ rm ~/.kde/share/apps/krusader/krusaderui.rc

If the ~/.kde/share/apps/krusader/krusaderui.rc file is older, then the new menu elements will not be shown. Read the previous question for information on how to update the krusaderui.rc file. If krusaderui.rc is missing or in a wrong directory, only the Help menu appears, please read the previous question.

9.

I am having trouble compiling and installing Krusader, how do I send a help request?

Please read our detailed installation procedure and the FAQ. If you cannot find a solution to your problem then feel free to post a help request at our Krusader forum or use the Krusader-users mailing list. But before posting a help request, please try the following:

  1. Use the Search function on the Krusader Forum, your problem might be solved or discussed already.

  2. If you cannot find a solution, please make a note of the following issues:

    • the Krusader version used

    • the Linux® distribution + version used

    • a good description of the problem

    Without this information, it is very difficult for us to help you.

    Note

    If you give us the error messages (e.g. make error messages) please start with the FIRST error message, all the error messages which follow the first error message are consequences and not the cause of your problem.

  3. Send out your help request.

Thank you for your co-operation!

10.

How can I build an RPM package for Krusader?

If you have experience with compiling from source, you will probably be able to build a Krusader RPM too. Information about RPM can be found at rpm.org and in the RPM Guide by Eric Foster-Johnson. The following is the short procedure howto on building an RPM.

Warning

NEVER build RPMs when logged in as root. Mistakes in building packages (e.g. a bad krusader.spec file) can do serious damage to your system when logged in as root.

  1. Compile Krusader from source to check that the compilation works fine.

  2. Check the ownership and the permissions on /usr/src/RPM/ and all recursive directories that your normal user can read-write-execute in these directories.

  3. Copy kusader-1.xx.tar.gz to /usr/scr/RPM/SOURCE

  4. Copy kusader.spec to /usr/scr/RPM/SPECS Tip: the latest kusader.spec can be found in the Git Repository.

  5. Edit kusader.spec and add your name, your email address, the rpm name, ... Other changes may be needed if rpmbuild fails.

  6. Build the binary and the source RPM with:

    $ rpmbuild -ba /usr/scr/RPM/SPECS/krusader.spec

    If everything went OK you will have a binary RPM in /usr/src/RPM/RPMS/i586 (depending on your architecture) and a source RPM in /usr/src/RPM/SRPMS/ e.g. krusader-1.70-beta1.suse10.i586.rpm and krusader-1.70-beta1.suse10.src.rpm

  7. If the build is not OK you will receive an error message during the rpmbuild process, try to fix it and run rpmbuild again.

  8. And finally: test the RPM before sending it in.

11.

Why does Krusader-git show an old version number in the about box?

Because we only change the version number just before we do a new release. Krusader-git will show an older version number, so ignore the version number and check the download date. We simply have not yet decided what the next version number will be.

12.

Why does Krusader not start on Mac® OS?

Please read carefully the macports.org installation instructions. Do not forget to start dbus.

##########################################################
# Do not forget that dbus needs to be started as the local
# user (not with sudo) before any KDE programs will launch
# To start it run the following command:                 
# launchctl load /Library/LaunchAgents/org.freedesktop.dbus-session.plist
##########################################################

######################################################
#  Programs will not start until you run the command
#  'sudo chown -R $USER ~/Library/Preferences/KDE' 
#  replacing $USER with your username.             
######################################################