Mounting

This configuration page contains all settings regarding the mounting of shares. The settings appearing here are depending on the operation system you are using.

The "Mounting" configuration page

Basic Settings

The settings in this tab are the same for all supported operating systems.

Directories

Mount prefix

This is the base folder (mount prefix) where Smb4K will mount the remote shares. It can be changed by using the URL requester (Click the button with the folder icon.) or by directly entering the new path into the text box. Path variables like $HOME are recognized.

Default: $HOME/smb4k/

Force generated subdirectories to be lower case

All subdirectories that are created by Smb4K below the mount prefix will be lower case.

Default: not selected

Behavior

Remount shares

Remount all your shares that were mounted when you exited the program or changed a profile. If the remounting of a share fails, Smb4K will retry the next time it is started. Shares that were mounted by other users are ignored.

Note

This setting does not affect the automatic remounting of shares when your computer woke up from a sleep state.

Default: not selected

Number of remount attempts

Set the number of attempts that are made to remount shares before Smb4K gives up.

Default: 1

Interval between remount attempts

Set the time that elapses between attempts to remount shares.

Default: 5 min

Unmount all personal shares on exit

Unmount all shares that belong to you when the program exits. Shares that are owned by other users are ignored.

Default: not selected

Force the unmounting of inaccessible shares

Force the unmounting of inaccessible shares (Linux® only). In case a share is inaccessible, a lazy unmount is performed. Before the actual unmounting is done, a warning dialog is shown asking to approve the unmount.

Default: not selected

Allow the unmounting of shares that are owned by other users

This option will allow you to unmount shares that were mounted by other users.

USE WITH EXTREME CAUTION!

Default: not selected

Detect all shares that are mounted on the system

You will not only see the shares that were mounted and are owned by you, but also all other mounts using the SMBFS (BSD) and CIFS (Linux®) file system that are present on the system.

Default: not selected

Common Mount Settings (Linux® only)

The Common Mount Settings tab is only available under Linux®. The settings present under BSD can be found in the Mount Settings (BSD only) section.

Common Options

Write access

Here you can determine if the shares should be mounted read-write or read-only by default. This option is independent of the file mask and the folder mask settings above.

Default: read-write

Client character set

Sets the character set used by the client side (i.e. your computer).

Default: default

File system port

Sets the file system port number that is used by mount.cifs(8) when mounting a remote share. The default port number (445) should work for all modern operating systems. If you experience problems, try setting the port number to 139. If the problems only occur with a few hosts, it is recommended to leave this option untouched and to use the Custom Options dialog to define individual port numbers for the problematic hosts.

This option is only available under Linux®. Under BSD, the port for mounting shares is set with the SMB port option.

Default: 445

CIFS Unix Extensions Support

All or most of the servers support the CIFS Unix extensions

Most versions of Samba support the CIFS Unix or POSIX extensions. For these servers, some options are not needed, because the right values are negotiated during the mount process. For other servers, you might want to uncheck this option, so that predefined values can be passed to the server. Please note that if your computer is located in a Windows dominated network neighborhood with only a few Samba servers, you can safely uncheck this option and define custom options for the Samba servers.

Default: selected

User ID

Sets the owner of the files and directories on the file system. By default, your UID is used. To change the UID, press the search button and choose one from the drop down menu.

Default: your UID

Group ID

Sets the group that owns the files and directories on the file system. By default, your GID is used. To change the GID, press the search button and choose one from the drop down menu.

Default: your GID

File mode

Sets the permissions that are applied to files. The value is given in octal and has to have 4 digits. To learn more about the file mode (file_mode), you should read the mount(8) and umask(2) manual pages.

Default: 0755

Directory mode

Sets the permissions that are applied to directories. The value is given in octal and has to have 4 digits. To learn more about the directory mode (dir_mode), you should read the mount(8) and umask(2) manual pages.

Default: 0755

Advanced Mount Settings (Linux® only)

The Advanced Mount Settings tab is only available under Linux®. The settings present under BSD can be found in the Mount Settings (BSD only) section.

Most of the options you can define here require Linux® kernel 2.6.15 or later to work.

Definitely assign the UID

Instruct the client (i.e. your side) to ignore any user ID (UID) provided by the server for files and directories and to always assign the owner to be the value of the transmitted UID.

Default: not selected

Definitely assign the GID

Instruct the client (i.e. your side) to ignore any group ID (GID) provided by the server for files and directories and to always assign the owner to be the value of the transmitted GID.

Default: not selected

Do permission checks

The client side checks if you have the correct UID and GID to manipulate files and directories on the share. This is in addition to the normal ACL check on the target machine done by the server software. You might want to switch this feature off, if the server(s) support the CIFS Unix extensions and you are, hence, not allowed to access the share.

Default: selected

Attempt to set UID and GID

If the CIFS Unix extensions are negotiated with the server the client side will attempt to set the effective UID and GID of the local process on newly created files, directories, and devices. If this feature is turned off, the default UID and GID defined for the share will be used. It is recommended that you read the manual page of mount.cifs(8) before you change this setting.

Default: not selected

Use server inode numbers

Use inode numbers (unique persistent file identifiers) returned by the server instead of automatically generating temporary inode numbers on the client side. This parameter has no effect if the server does not support returning inode numbers or similar. It is recommended that you read the manual page of mount.cifs(8) before you change this setting.

Default: selected

Translate reserved characters

Translate six of the seven reserved characters (not backslash, but including the colon, question mark, pipe, asterisk, greater than and less than characters) to the remap range (above 0xF000), which also allows the client side to recognize files created with such characters by Windows®’s POSIX emulation. This can also be useful when mounting to most versions of Samba. This has no effect if the server does not support Unicode.

Default: not selected

Do not use locking

Do not use locking. Do not start lockd.

Default: not selected

SMB protocol version

Define which version of the SMB protocol is to be used.

The following values are allowed:

1.0 (Classic CIFS/SMBv1 protocol)

The vers=1.0 command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to use the classic CIFS/SMBv1 protocol.

2.0 (Windows Vista SP1/Windows Server 2008)

The vers=2.0 command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to use the SMBv2.002 protocol. This was initially introduced in Windows Vista Service Pack 1, and Windows Server 2008.

Note

Note that the initial release version of Windows Vista spoke a slightly different dialect (2.000) that is not supported.

2.1 (Windows 7/Windows Server 2008R2)

The vers=2.1 command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to use the SMBv2.1 protocol that was introduced in Microsoft Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008R2.

3.0 (Windows 8/Windows Server 2012)

The vers=3.0 command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to use the SMBv3.0 protocol that was introduced in Microsoft Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012.

3.1.1 (Windows Server 2016)

The vers=3.1.1 or vers=3.11 command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to use the SMBv3.1.1 protocol that was introduced in Windows Server 2016.

Default: 3.0 (Windows 8/Windows Server 2016)

Cache mode

Define how read and write requests are handled. In case you choose to not cache file data at all, the client never utilizes the cache for normal reads and writes. It always accesses the server directly to satisfy a read or write request. If you choose to follow the CIFS/SMB2 protocol strictly, the cache is only trusted if the client holds an oplock. If the client does not hold an oplock, then the client bypasses the cache and accesses the server directly to satisfy a read or write request. Choosing to allow loose caching semantics can sometimes provide better performance on the expense of cache coherency. This option might cause data corruption, if several clients access the same set of files on the server at the same time. Because of this, the strict cache mode is recommended.

The following values are allowed:

Do not cache file data at all

The cache=none command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to not cache file data at all.

Follow the CIFS/SMB2 protocol strictly

The cache=strict command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to follow the CIFS/SMB2 protocol strictly.

Allow loose caching semantics

The cache=loose command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to allow loose caching semantics.

Default: Follow the CIFS/SMB2 protocol strictly

Security mode

Security mode. To be able to use this option, the CIFS kernel module 1.40 or later is needed.

The allowed values are:

Connect as a null user (no name)

The sec=none command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to attempt to connect as a null user (no name).

Kerberos 5 authentication

The sec=krb5 command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to use Kerberos version 5 authentication.

Kerberos 5 authentication and packet signing

The sec=krb5i command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to use Kerberos version 5 authentication and force packet signing.

NTLM protocol

The sec=ntlm command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to use NTLM password hashing. Up to Linux® kernel version 3.8 this is the default setting.

NTLM protocol and packet signing

The sec=ntlmi command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to use NTLM password hashing and force packet signing.

NTLMv2 protocol

The sec=ntlmv2 command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to use NTLMv2 password hashing.

NTLMv2 protocol and packet signing

The sec=ntlmv2i command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to use NTLMv2 password hashing and force packet signing.

NTLMSSP protocol

The sec=ntlmssp command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to use NTLMv2 password hashing encapsulated in a Raw NTLMSSP message. Since Linux® kernel version 3.8 this is the default setting.

NTLMSSP protocol and packet signing

The sec=ntlmssp command line argument is used. This causes mount.cifs(8) to use NTLMv2 password hashing encapsulated in a Raw NTLMSSP message and force packet signing.

Default: NTLMSSP protocol

Additional options

Define additional options for use with mount.cifs(8). Clicking the edit button to the right of the line edit opens an input dialog where the options have to be provided in a comma-separated list. After clicking OK in the input dialog, the options will be checked against a whitelist. All valid entries are accepted and entered into to line edit.

Default: empty

Mount Settings (BSD only)

The Mount Settings tab is only available under FreeBSD, NetBSD and DragonFly BSD. The settings present under Linux® can be found in the Common Mount Settings (Linux® only) and Advanced Mount Settings (Linux® only) sections.

Common Options

User ID

Sets the owner of the files and directories on the file system. By default, your UID is used. To change the UID, press the search button and choose one from the drop down menu.

Default: your UID

Group ID

Sets the group that owns the files and directories on the file system. By default, your GID is used. To change the GID, press the search button and choose one from the drop down menu.

Default: your GID

File mode

Sets the permissions that are applied to files. The value is given in octal and has to have 4 digits. To learn more about the file mode, you should read the mount_smbfs(8) and umask(2) manual pages.

Default: 0755

Directory mode

Sets the permissions that are applied to directories. The value is given in octal and has to have 4 digits. To learn more about the directory mode (dir_mode), you should read the mount_smbfs(8) and umask(2) manual pages.

Default: 0755

Character Sets

Use character sets

Use the specified local and server's character sets (see below).

Default: not selected

Client character set

Use the specified local character set.

Default: default

Server character set

Use the specified server's character set.

Default: default