Rules for Individual Games

Klondike

Klondike is the most famous patience — most likely because it comes with a well-known operating system. It is played with one deck.

The goal in Klondike is to put all cards, as real families, ascending on the foundation. This gets easier once all cards are lying face up in the playing piles.

The sequences on the playing piles have to be put there in descending order. The cards should alternate in colors (red and black). You can move whole sequences or parts of it, if the first card fits on another pile.

On a free pile you can put a king of any color, or a sequence starting with a king.

When you click on the talon, one card from it will be moved to the waste pile. You can move it to the playing piles or the foundation from there. If the talon is empty, you can move the complete waste pile to the talon by clicking on the empty talon.

You can look through the cards on the talon as much as you like.

Grandfather

This game was introduced to Paul Olav Tvete, the original developer of KPatience, by his grandfather; it is named after this. No other patience games are known to implement this patience game variant.

In Grandfather, one deck is dealt to seven playing piles. Some cards on each pile are face down on the initial deal.

The goal is to put all cards as real families ascending on the foundation piles.

You can move every card on every pile if it fits on another card, to build a real sequence of descending order. For example, you can move the five of spades on top of the six of spades, no matter how many cards on are on top of the five of spades. Just the six of spades has to be on top of its pile.

On a free pile you can place a king (again no matter how many cards are on top of it).

If there are no more possible moves, you can redeal the cards. A redeal consists of picking up the cards from the playing piles (pile by pile, left to right) and redealing them in the starting pattern (zigzagging rows of face down cards forming a peak and then left to right rows of face up cards on top). Note that the cards are not shuffled and that cards on the foundation piles are left untouched. You may redeal no more than twice in a single game.

Even though the rules are simple and allow many moves, the game is still hard to win. Despite this, or because of it, this game remains a joy to play.

Aces Up

This patience has simple rules, yet is hard to win. It is played with one deck. The goal is to put all cards besides aces onto the foundation. There should be an ace left on every playing pile afterwards.

Each top card that is of the same suit (e.g. spades) and has a lower value than another top card (e.g. six of spades and four of spades) can be put on the foundation by clicking on it.

If you cannot move any more cards to the foundation, you can get a new card for each playing pile by clicking on the talon.

On a free pile you can move every other card on top of a pile. You should use these moves to free piles. That way, new cards can be moved to the foundation.

The auto drop feature is disabled in this patience game.

Freecell

Freecell is played with one card deck. You have four free cells in the top left corner. In addition there are four foundation piles, and eight playing piles below.

The goal of the game is to have all cards as real families ascending on the foundation. You can achieve this often if you know how to play: Freecell is solvable at a rate of 99.9% approximately — of the first 32,000 deals there is only one unsolvable (11,982 if you want to know).

In the playing piles you have to build descending sequences, where red and black cards alternate. You can put any card in a free cell.

You can only move one card that lays on top of a pile or a free cell. Sequences can only be moved if you have enough free space (either free cells or free playing piles) to place the cards.

The maximum amount of cards you can move is calculated by:

To solve this game it is recommended to grab the cards out of the playing sequences in the same order they have to be put into the foundation (first the aces, then the twos, etc.)

You should try to keep as many free cells and/or playing piles empty, so you can build sequences as long as possible.

Mod3

Mod3 is played with two card decks. The goal is to put all cards on the top three rows. In those you have to build sequences of the same color. In the first row you have to create the sequence 2-5-8-J, in the second row the sequence 3-6-9-Q, and in the third row the sequence 4-7-10-K. The suit of the cards must be the same in each sequence, so you can only put a five of hearts on top of a two of hearts.

The fourth row is both your waste pile and playing pile. On an empty slot you can put any card from the first three rows, or one from the top of the fourth row.

You can put aces on the aces piles, on top of the talon. They are in the game so you have a starting point for creating free slots.

If you cannot move any more cards, you can get new cards on the fourth row by clicking on the talon.

The auto drop feature is disabled in this patience game.

Gypsy

Gypsy is played with two card decks. The aim is to put all cards in real families ascending on the foundation.

The playing piles have to be descending, while red and black cards have to alternate. You can only move sequences or single cards. On a free slot you can put any card or sequence.

If you cannot move any more cards, you can click on the talon to get new cards on each playing pile.

In using the Undo feature you can ease the game quite a lot, as you have to take many decisions and some of them might turn out to be wrong after you clicked the talon.

Forty & Eight

Forty & Eight is played with two card decks. The goal is to put all cards as real families on the foundation.

The playing piles have to be descending. Colors are important. You can only put a five of hearts on a six of hearts, for example.

You can only move one card on top of a pile. You can put any card in a free slot.

By clicking on the talon you can put a card on the waste pile; from there you can put it on a playing pile or the foundation (KPatience will do this for you). If the talon is empty you can put all cards on the waste pile back on the talon. This works only once: after the second time the talon empties, the game is over.

This patience is difficult to solve. With some experience you can solve many of the deals, especially if you use the Undo feature from time to time to correct your decisions, and the decisions KPatience makes in putting cards on the foundation.

Simple Simon

Simple Simon is played with one card deck. The goal is to put all cards as real families on the foundation.

In the playing piles you can build sequences. In general you don't have to care about the suits of the cards, but sequences can only be moved if they are part of a real sequence. For example, you can move the six of spades if the five of spades is on top of it, but may not move it if the five of clubs is on top of it.

The cards can only be moved to the foundation if all 13 cards of one family lay on top of each other in the playing piles.

Suggestion

You should try as soon as possible to move the cards to the correct piles, to create free piles to place cards on temporarily, since you can put any card on those.

With enough free room you can build families on free slots independently of the color. If you have all cards in such families you can sort them by color, so they can be moved to the foundation.

Yukon

Yukon is played with one card deck. The goal is to put all cards as real families ascending on the foundation.

The sequences on the playing piles have to be descending with alternating red and black cards. You can move every face up card no matter how many cards are on top of it. So you can put a five of hearts on a six of spades if that one is on top of its pile.

In a free slot you can put a king of any color (again, no matter how many cards are on top of it).

Grandfather's Clock

Grandfather's clock is a simple patience game. With some experience you should be able to solve most deals. It is played with one card deck. The aim is to put the cards as real ascending sequences on the foundation.

The foundation is on the right-hand side and consists of 12 piles that form the shape of a clock. The nine is at 12 o'clock, the queen is at 3 o'clock, the three is at 6 o'clock and the six is at 9 o'clock.

There are 8 playing piles beside the clock and on each are 5 cards. On the playing piles you can build descending sequences. The color of the cards is not important. You can only move one card at a time.

Golf

Golf is played with one card deck. The goal of Golf is to move all the cards on the tableau to the foundation.

The layout of golf solitaire is straightforward. At the beginning of the game you will see the tableau. On it are seven columns each containing five cards. The talon and the foundation are below.

Playing golf solitaire is simple, but requires strategy to win. The cards at the base of each column on the tableau are available for play. Available cards are built upon the top foundation card in ascending or descending sequence regardless of suit. If there are no moves available a card may be dealt from the talon to the foundation. The game is over when all the cards in the talon have been dealt and there are no more possible moves.

Spider

Spider is played with two card decks. The cards are dealt out into 10 playing piles, 4 of 6 cards and 6 of 5 cards each. This leaves 50 cards that can be dealt out 10 at a time, one on each playing pile.

In the playing piles, a card can be placed on another card of any suit and of one higher value. A sequence of descending cards of the same suit may be moved from one playing pile to another.

The goal of spider is to put all cards as real families descending from Kings anywhere in the playing piles. When such a family is built in a playing pile, it is removed to the lower-left corner of the window.

The different levels determine how many suits are dealt - Easy uses 1 suit, Medium uses 2 suits, and Hard uses all 4 suits. The game is fairly easy to win at Easy level, and very difficult to win at Hard level.